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ENGR2017CULVER43732 ENGR

Self-Erecting Inverted Pendulum

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Steve Culver Engineering
Advisor(s): Walt Williamson Engineering
Location: Session: 1; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 8

poster location

In this experiment, we examine the non-linear dynamics of a mechanical system consisting of an inverted pendulum with one free-turning rotational degree-of-freedom attached to a computer-controlled cart with one linear degree-of-freedom. Using a Quanser Linear Servo Base Unit with Inverted Pendulum and paired software package, we used first principles to develop the non-linear control system needed to move the pendulum from stable equilibrium to unstable equilibrium and maintain unstable equilibrium. This combines the self-erecting inverted pendulum experiment and the classic pendulum experiment. Through the paired software package, we were able to derive the dynamic equations to develop the transfer function and proportional-velocity feedback system that describe the linear motion of the cart, successfully creating the non-linear control system for both phases of the experiment.

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ENGR2017CULVER58673 ENGR

Use of an Xbox Kinect™ as a 3D Scanner for the Manufacturing of Custom Orthotic Insoles

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Steve Culver Engineering
Advisor(s): Steve Weis Engineering
Location: Session: 2; 1st Floor; Table Number: 6

poster location

This report examines the function, accuracy, and ease of use of an XBOX Kinect™ as a 3D surface scanner. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate the utility of a Kinect™ for XBOX 360 (Microsoft®) paired with Skanect (Occipital) and MeshLab software packages as a low cost solution to surface scanning and processing. My conclusion is that the Kinect™ is able to accurately model the recorded point cloud as a continuous 3D surface that matches the contour and scale of the test subject surface. Both Skanect and MeshLab effectively interpolated the smoothing of the 3D surfaces and provided higher resolution imaging than an unaltered image. The resultant resolution of the contoured surface is higher than the resolution of the 3D printers used in this experiment, demonstrating an effective digital duplication of a physical surface.

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ENGR2017GETZ62984 ENGR

Design and Development of an Electronic Stability System for a Digital Small Hole Gauge

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Lauren Getz Engineering Robin Livesay Engineering Karla Lopez Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 2

poster location

For this project, a digital grip gauge was designed for Lockheed Martin to measure the grip length of the aircraft skin of the F-35. The objective of the electrical group is to ensure that the gauge will be capable of recognizing when the measurement has stabilized. When stabilized, a light will turn on, which allows the operator to know the measurement is ready for reading. We developed three prototypes that each complete this objective. The first prototype uses two force sensitive resistors (FSR) powered by Arduino. The Arduino code is programmed to turn on a light when the forces on the sensors are equal for a certain range within different zones. The second prototype consists of a comparator circuit with two FSRs connected to a NAND gate. When both FSRs measure the same force, within a range, a light will turn on. The third prototype utilizes two small push buttons that complete a circuit. When both buttons are pressed, the circuit is completed and a light will turn on, indicating to the operator that the part is flush with the aircraft skin and the measurement is stabilized. While each of these prototypes satisfies the objective, the third prototype was ultimately selected due to size constraints of the gauge design.

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ENGR2017HALL10343 ENGR

Image Reconstruction Using Compressive Line Sensing

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Maya Hall Engineering
Advisor(s): Sue Gong Engineering
Location: Session: 1; B0; Table Number: 2

poster location

Compressive line sensing is a process of acquiring data and reconstructing images. The objective of this study is to explore the impact of the two parameters that are used in the image reconstruction algorithm on the quality of the reconstructed image. These two parameters are the compression ratio and the line group. The compression ratio is the ratio of the number of measurements taken at each line vs. the resolution of each line. The line group is the number of lines that are grouped together and solved jointly when reconstructing the image. A higher compression ratio results in degraded image quality because less measurement data is used to reconstruct the image. The larger the line group, the better the quality of the image at a cost of longer computation time. The key is to find a balance between the compression ratio and line group choices so that the image is reconstructed with as little data as possible while still maintaining a high image quality. We will present images reconstructed with different compression ratio and line group based on the data obtained in air and in water.

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ENGR2017SCHMITZBERGER13895 ENGR

Design and Development of a Digital Grip Gauge using a Split Ball Probe

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Evan Schmitzberger Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 6

poster location

The objective of our work is to design and build a depth gauge that efficiently and accurately measures the depth of a narrow hole, and give feedback via an electronic screen on the device. This design is being made for Lockheed Martin and will allow their employees to measure a large amount of rivet holes both quicker and more accurately than their current solution. Speeding up the measuring process while retaining accuracy will cut down on production time significantly. Our design was founded on the idea of a small hole gage, we modified the gage to be set up as a probe and anchor onto the back side of the hole. The probe has been coined as a “split-ball” due to its inner shaft splitting the outer shaft that contains a ball type end effecter. Our prototype has been through many iterations utilizing the on campus Fab Lab to 3D print most of our parts. Our mechanical team has been in close work with our electrical team to ensure that the mechanics and electronics function together seamlessly.

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ENGR2017SMITH41122 ENGR

Design and Development of a Digital Small Hole Gauge using a Wire Probe

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Logan Smith Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering
Location: Session: 2; 1st Floor; Table Number: 1

poster location

The objective of our work is to design and build a depth gauge that efficiently and accurately measures the depth of a narrow hole, and give feedback via an electronic screen on the device. This design is being made for Lockheed and Martin and will allow their employees to measure a large amount of rivet holes both quicker and more accurately than their current solution. Speeding up the measuring process while retaining accuracy will cut down on production time significantly. Our design is small enough to be held in one hand and contains a wire probe that is plunged into the hole and latches onto the other side. The probe is “Tweezer-like” in design, with two wires that collapse and expand with the use of a button. Many parts of our design are made using a 3D printer for convenience and repeatability. Our design is able to communicate with electronics stored within the gauge that measures the depth and displays to an LCD screen.

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ENGR2017TEAGUE7756 ENGR

Design of an Automated Adhesive Dispensing System

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Connor Teague Engineering
Advisor(s): Sue Gong Engineering
Location: Session: 2; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 7

poster location

Klein Tools is a major hand tools manufacturer in US focused on electrical and utility applications for professionals. One of Klein Tools products is called a fish rod that is used by professional electricians to pull wiring through walls, conduit, and plenums to route wire from one place to another. The current fish rod assembly process at Klein Tools involves manual dispensing of glue into the metal connectors before affixing them to fiberglass rods. The objective of this Klein Tools-sponsored project is to improve the throughput of assembly system and increase the accuracy and the consistency of the amount of glue dispensed to reduce product failures and adhesive waste.

The overall system in development consists of an automated metal connector orientation system, conveyor belt assembly, a glue dispensing system and a control system. Through the application of vibratory hopper feeders, pneumatic rotary tables and grippers, sensing cameras, break line sensors, and a conveyor belt, the system will orient the metal connectors glue side up, and present the connectors with adhesive to the operator for final assembly of the fish rods.

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ENGR2017THACH58782 ENGR

Trajectory tracking in unmanned electric vehicles

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Bao Thach Engineering Irene Kwihangana Engineering
Advisor(s): Morgan Kiani Engineering
Location: Session: 2; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 4

poster location

In this research project, the aim was to create a small, self-operated robot car to transport items. In addition, the robot-car can generate a distance when traveling through unknown places, and self-locate them in the next travels. The student authors hope that this robot car can be used to physically communicate and send medical supplies between severe patients and doctors in hospitals.

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