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ENSC2019SMITH36121 ENSC

A GIS Analysis of the Environmental Impacts of Cobalt Mining

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Tiffany Smith Environmental Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 13

poster location

Africa's copper belt contains two-thirds of the entire world's cobalt, a mineral required for the production of cell phones, laptops, and most importantly, electric automobiles. No area has been more dramatically impacted by the increasing demand for this mineral than the Democratic Republic of Congo. Dramatic images of the environmental and human impacts of the mining industry can be found in the news and on the internet. A GIS analysis was conducted to look at the environmental impacts of the mining industry on the land cover and environment in the Congo. Landsat satellite images were collected over various time periods and analyzed for land cover and vegetation changes to document and quantify the impact of the mining activities.

ENSC2019WINER65351 ENSC

Urbanization in a sector of DFW

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Zane Winer Biology
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 2

poster location

Urbanization is a central theme to humanity’s progress in large metropolitan areas. However, desire for greenspace and nature are also shown to be integral for citizen happiness and peace. At what rate does urbanization occur within a small area of DFW that is often considered suburban? Is this urbanization mostly residential or is this the fault of corporate land usage? This study uses GIS to investigate the differences over time in natural spaces vs. manmade structures by looking at differences in vegetation to assess the rate of urbanization in one of the most quickly developing areas in Texas.

(Poster is private)

GEOL2019CAVES50910 GEOL

Understanding Metal-Silicate Mixing in Mesosiderites

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Lindsay Caves Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Rhiannon Mayne Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 1st Floor; Table Number: 5

poster location

Mesosiderites are meteorites composed of equal parts metal and crustal silicate material, which have been linked to the HED parent body 4Vesta. The metal portion of mesosiderites is also compositionally similar to the IIIAB irons. Mesosiderite silicates were mixed with metal, recrystallized and rapidly cooled. The slow metallographic cooling rates recorded by mesosiderite metal indicate mixing followed by deep burial within an asteroidal body. Several models for the formation of mesosiderites have been proposed, but no single model can completely explain their multi-stage history. Oxygen isotope compositions of mesosiderites and eucrites are identical, consistent with the HEDs and mesosiderites originating from a common parent body. However, there are notable differences between the two groups. These include the differing Fe-Mn-Mg systematics in mesosiderite pyroxenes, which reflect an FeO reduction trend and not the magmatic trend seen in the HEDs. Phosphates and tridymite are also more abundant in mesosiderites than howardites and eucrites. These differences have been attributed to redox reactions that occurred during the metal-silicate mixing stage of mesosiderite formation. As previous work focused mainly on the silicate portion, this study examines the metal of five mesosiderite samples of varying petrologic class and degree of metamorphism. Thick sections of each meteorite containing both matrix metal and metal nodules were requested on loan from the National Meteorite Collection, located in the National Museum of Natural History, Department of Mineral Sciences. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of both silicate and metal portions of each mesosiderite were collected, as well as LA-ICP-MS analyses of the matrix metal and metal nodules within each section. The dataset will be analyzed for evidence of redox reactions and other processes that may have been occurring during the metal-silicate mixing phase of mesosiderite formation. If redox reactions occurred between the metal and silicate portions of mesosiderites, then: 1) the matrix metal within mesosiderites may be depleted in readily oxidizable elements (e.g. P, W) relative to the metal nodules that are not in contact with the silicate phase; or, 2) all metal in mesosiderites is depleted in readily oxidizable elements. This depletion should be visible when compared to IIIAB irons of a similar composition.

(Poster is private)

GEOL2019CHEN17381 GEOL

Geomimicry as a solution to high atmospheric CO2 levels

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Guangshun Chen Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Omar Harvey Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 4

poster location

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions are a huge problem that plagues our planet. It causes numerous health and environmental issues that are already causing long term damage. This project was designed to combat those issues by using geomimicry to extract and convert CO2 from the air into the rock mineral, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is the main way carbon is naturally sequestered on Earth. We first built an apparatus that could: pump carbon dioxide in, measure carbon dioxide levels, and become airtight. We then poured 1 gallon of water and 6 grams of calcium hydroxide (CaOH2) into this apparatus and shook it to thoroughly dissolve the CaOH2 into solution. After that we bubbled in Carbon Dioxide for 2, 4, 5 or 6 seconds. After recording our results we determined the k-value or efficacy of the reaction, this value is also known as as the rate constant. This showed us that the experiment is most effective at lower concentrations. To further prove the viability of this approach we redid the experiment at 2 seconds and then weighed the Calcium Carbonate produced. Because the reaction has a 1:1:1:1 molar ratio we were able to determine the moles of Carbon Dioxide that were removed from the system. We found that our system worked incredibly (Approximately 95-99%) well at removing added Carbon Dioxide from the apparatus.

GEOL2019CORONA14323 GEOL

Coltan Mining in Democractic of Republic of the Congo and Its Relation with War

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Genesiss Corona Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tammie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; Basement; Table Number: 10

poster location

Coltan Mining Sites and Conflict for Technology
There has been ongoing conflict in the African country of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The source of conflict is due to a highly valued mineral known as coltan. The mineral is found within the Kivu regions, near the border of Rwanda. The mineral coltan also known as tantalum which is “Tantalum is used to store the electricity in cell phones and other devices, and it is referred to, by those in the industry and by human rights groups, as one of the “3 Ts” (tantalum, tungsten, and tin) that, along with gold, are present in nearly every digital device” (Smith, 18). The extraction of this mineral has brought much social unrest and violence within the country for the sake of technology. There has been constant war within this region which has forced many people to flee from their homes, resulted in deaths, violence and forced child labor. A GIS analysis was done to show correlation between the location of the mining sites in Kivu and its effects on the environment and population.

GEOL2019DEBONE30636 GEOL

Newly discovered old volcano in Big Bend National Park

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Kristin DeBone Geological Sciences Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Richard Hanson Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 8

poster location

Recent field work has discovered a volcanic complex within the Paleocene Black Peaks Formation in the northwestern part of Big Bend National Park in west Texas. This is the only known Paleocene volcano in west Texas. We have identified pyroclastic deposits consisting of ash-sized and coarser clasts, including volcanic bombs and blocks, which were erupted explosively from a nearby vent. Margins of the volcanic complex have been mapped using remote sensing because the volcanic rocks are distinctly different in color from the adjacent shale. Characteristics of the pyroclastics suggest derivation from phreatomagmatic eruptions, which occurred when magma and groundwater violently interacted in the shallow subsurface.

(Poster is private)

GEOL2019DONAHOO65357 GEOL

Using Non-Invasive Geophysical Techniques in Near-Surface Infrastructure and Agricultural Planning and Management

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Michaela Donahoo Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Omar Harvey Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 7

poster location

Using Non-Invasive Geophysical Techniques in Near-Surface Infrastructure Planning and Management

Michaela Donahoo1, Karim Ouamer-ali2,3, Youcef Daoud2, Kaddour Djili3, Omar R. Harvey1
1Department of Geological Sciences, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, USA.
2 National Institute of Agronomic Research of Algeria (INRAA), El-Harrach, Algeria.
3Ecole Nationale Supérieure Agronomique (ENSA), El-Harrach, Algeria.

Understanding soil characteristic variability geospatially as a function of depth and time is key to the optimal implementation of subsurface infrastructure planning and expansion. The soils physical behavior as well as its interaction with piping and road materials determine where such a system could divert and predict future maintenance frequency. Central to the development of site-specific, precision management strategies is the quantification and mapping of the geospatial variability in soil properties at significantly higher resolutions than provided in current soil surveys. The presentation will cover results from ongoing collaborative research efforts between researchers at Texas Christian University and two Algerian institutions in using non-invasive measurements of bulk apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) to quantify and map 3-D soil variability in semi-arid and arid areas of Algeria, Northern Africa. The focus will be on the derivation and application of depth-specific ECa-ECe (saturated paste), ECa-clay content and ECa-water content relationships for use in understanding seasonal salinity and water dynamics within potential depths of construction interest.

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GEOL2019FERRARI22030 GEOL

GIS as a Tool for Mapping Potential Locations of Geologic Outcrops in the Ouachita Mountains

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Bennett Ferrari Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences Xie Xiangyang Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 2

poster location

A GIS analysis was conducted to analyze digital map layers of soils, bedrock geology and topography including slope looking for differences in erosional topography that would result in an exposed geologic outcrop. This study was conducted in the region of the Ouachita Mountains that extends from North Central Texas through Oklahoma into Arkansas. For this study, know geologic outcrop locations were mapped and used as test sites.

GEOL2019HOLLAND18000 GEOL

DFW Interpolation Study of Pollution Congregation Insight for Real Estate Market Analysis

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Claire Holland Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 3

poster location

Pollution is a distinguished and growing environmental issue among urban centers across the world. GIS interpolation methods can allow visualization of air toxics data that is intuitive and insightful. This data can be collected and aggregated to produce pollution density maps. I will be working with interpolation methods for the DFW metroplex over a specific time period to determine areas where pollution has become a major growing issue. I will use this information to assess the overall effect on DFW property values, and what this means in regards to future real estate market analysis. By knowing where the pollutants are congregating, I can effectively predict which property values will rise and fall due to the overall effects of pollution.

GEOL2019JACKSON44843 GEOL

Evolution of the Trinity River - Fort Worth, TX

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Blake Jackson Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 1st Floor; Table Number: 3

poster location

The past 20 years has seen significant change in urbanization and commercial development along the Trinity River of Fort Worth, Texas. Significant projects such as Panther Island and the Trinity River Project are major proposals here. A GIS analysis using historical aerial photography and satellite imagery was conducted to examine the impact of urbanization on green space, tree-cover, overall greenness, and vegetation patterns at Fort Worth’s Trinity River.

GEOL2019LAMB52985 GEOL

A Source to Sink Analysis of the Dockum Group in the West Texas Highplains

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Grayson Lamb Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): John Holbrook Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 9

poster location

The fundamental understanding of any geologic basin stems from ascertaining the relationship between its source and sink. Every basin is therefore identified as a “sink” and has a provisional “source.” The investigation of this fundamental relationship is the preliminary exploration step to further basin development.
The Late Triassic Dockum Group of the west Texas high plains is an understudied group that begs investigation into the source to sink relationship. A comprehensive study of the Dockum Group as a “sink” is here undertaken in order to better understand the paleoclimate and its implications on the Dockum group depositional style. This study focuses on the northern most section of the Dockum group outcrop system. Within the study area it is subdivided into three main formations, the Tecovas mud, Trujillo sand, and Cooper Canyon sand-mud mix system.
This study showcases a forward stratigraphic modeling software, Dionisos Flow. From field based outcrop work: grain size, channel thickness, water discharge, and lithofacies assemblages were quantified as model inputs in Dionisos Flow.
The study aims to model Dockum Group sedimentation in order to determine the plausible paleoclimate, and its related depositional environment and depositional style. To do so, an outcrop study and fluvial architecture analysis was completed to serve as model input variables. Then a forward stratigraphic Dionisos Flow model of the three main Dockum Group formations was generated. It was then analyzed and coupled with the outcrop study to draw conclusions on the necessary Triassic climate conditions to produce the Dockum Group deposits.
Per the modeling exercise and outcrop study it is concluded that the Triassic climate was highly variable, shifting between semi-arid to humid. Its variability has been underemphasized in previous studies. Climate alterations are on a scale of 103 years. Additionally, the Dockum Group’s sedimentation style has been a forum of contradicting theories. This study has concluded that Dockum sands were deposited in a predominantly upper flow regime environment during humid climate cycles, while its abundant muds were deposited in lower flow during semi arid climate cycles.

(Poster is private)

GEOL2019LAURENTI12129 ENSC

Energetics and Bonding Dynamics in Amino and non-Amino Organic Molecules and Iron Oxides

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Alec Laurenti Environmental Sciences
Advisor(s): Omar Harvey Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; Basement; Table Number: 13

poster location

Iron oxides have a controlling effect on how carbon and contaminants move through the which has impacts on climate change and pollution. Carbon held more tightly to the soil can be sequestered for longer periods of time. These tightly held contaminants are less of a threat to spread and impact groundwater. The driving factor in the movement of these compounds are the binding-debinding energies. This study will use flow adsorption microcalorimetry to systematically analyze the energetics and bonding dynamics involved in different combinations of iron oxides and organic molecules of varying carbon chain lengths (along with the presence of amine functional groups). This will allow us to isolate the effect that these different chain lengths have as well as the presence of amine functional groups. The study will focus on the systematic collection and analysis of experimental data that can be used to support the development, validation, and refinement of computational models of interactions involving natural organic matter at the metal oxide-water interface while facilitating the further development of experimentally-driven understandings of binding-debinding dynamics of organic molecules onto mineral surfaces.

(Poster is private)

GEOL2019MEL8440 GEOL

A GIS Analysis of Seasonal Trends in Atmospheric Particulate Matter across Texas from 2017-2018

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Manyiel Mel Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences Omar Harvey Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 7

poster location

A variety of health studies have established an association between exposure to particle pollution and an array of significant health risks. For individuals with pre-existing heart or lung disease, older people, and children, exposure to particle pollution can result in increased hospital admissions, emergency room visits, absences from school or work, and restricted activity. A GIS analysis was conducted to map the distribution of particular matter (PM2.5) across the state of Texas, looking at seasonal variations over the period of 2017 and 2018. Ambient temperature data were also collected, interpolated and analyzed. Data was collected from TCEQ for different monitoring stations across Texas and mapped to visualize the areas in Texas that might be exposed to higher levels of PM2.5. The data were analyzed looking for trends based on season variations and locations in Texas.

GEOL2019MIRKIN10373 GEOL

Background Color Matching in Texas Horned Lizards

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Stephen Mirkin Biology
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 1

poster location

Texas horned lizards are a threatened species in the state of Texas with declines attributed to a variety of factors including: habitat conversion, pesticide use and red imported fire ants. These cryptic lizards in their natural habitats utilize a variety of anti-predator defense mechanisms. The primary defensive adaptation to avoid predators is often cited as their cryptic coloration, which is often suggested to color match the background substrates of the regions where they are found. Although background color-matching is purported to be an important factor in horned lizard defensive strategies it has never been empirically tested. Here we present the first known study of background color matching of Texas horned lizards in the state of Texas. We used a GIS analysis using soils and satellite imagery data to test how well Texas horned lizards match the soils and substrate in different regions of Texas.

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GEOL2019PEREZ40118 GEOL

Area Growth of Fort Worth, Texas in Zip Codes 76131, 76177, 76137, and 76244

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Dylan Perez Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 1

poster location

Over the last 20 years significant growth has occurred in the northern part of Fort Worth, Texas defined by the zip codes 76131, 76137, 76177, and 76244. Using GIS analysis, this project measured the amount of open area lost and the growth of residential and commercial areas.

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GEOL2019STIEFFEL51148 GEOL

Evidence for an Old Parana delta and Diachroneity in Global Highstands

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Rodney Stieffel Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): John Holbrook Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 4

poster location

The highstand deltas of the Holocene tend to each initiate with the peaking of eustatic sea level rise at about 7000 y.b.p. While generally tied to this time, the initiation of highstand shorelines is not necessarily synchronous. Local impacts on relative sea level can impact this timing. In particular, the Parana Delta, Argentina, appears to have initiated as early as 8100 y.b.p., well before the global sea level peak and potentially before any comparable highstand shorelines. The Parana Delta encompasses an area of ~17,400 km2 enclosed in the Rio de la Plata estuary, growing steadily at a rate of approximately 2 km2 yr-1 for roughly the past 6000 yrs. This deltaic system has shifted from fluvial, to wave-dominated, and then back to its present day fluvial dominated system. Aerial and satellite imagery, shallow boreholes, radiometric dating of shells and sand, and Ground Penetrating Radar are used to define the distinctive sedimentary features of the delta. New data from the upper part of the delta indicates the Parana Delta initiated well before the 6000 y.b.p. previously reported. Sediment cores collected from across the upper delta are used to identify sedimentary facies and construct a stratigraphic framework. Three OSL samples collected from the oldest set of beach ridge s indicate the first ridges formed approximately 8100 years ago. These beach ridges are <3 m above sea level and argue for an early peak in relative sea level. Highstand strata are about 6 m thick above a thin (1-2 m) condensed section above transgressive shoreface deposits. The Parana delta initiated at least 1500 years before the sea level peak. Assumptions of synchronicity of highstands with eustatic sea level accordingly must be tempered with comparable allowance for local error.

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GEOL2019TALBERT42796 GEOL

Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian Stratigraphy and Shale Gas Potential of the Palo Duro Basin

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Brendan Talbert Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Cheyenne Xie Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 11

poster location

The Palo Duro Basin is a northwest-southeast trending cratonic basin in the Texas Panhandle that formed from uplift of the Amarillo/Wichita Mountains during the Pennsylvanian, and subsequent subsidence during the Permian. Sediments were deposited in a number of environments, the most prominent being fan-delta, carbonate shelf, and deep basin settings. Major lithologies in the Pennsylvanian are granite wash, shelf-margin carbonates, and basinal shales, while the Permian hosts the same lithologies, as well as numerous evaporites and red-bed sequences.
This study analyzes log data from 100+ wells in the Palo Duro Basin to correlate and determine the lateral extent of different facies throughout the basin during the Pennsylvanian and Permian. Cross-sections made will help to generate isopach, structure, and other geological maps to identify areas where further geochemical and/or petrophysical analyses can be performed to evaluate Pennsylvanian and lower Permian shale gas potential of the Palo Duro Basin. This project will establish a more detailed stratigraphic framework of Pennsylvanian and lower Permian aged sediments of the basin, as well as determine source rock quality and thermal maturity for potential shale gas plays within the Palo Duro Basin, with a more thorough look along the southern fringes of the basin near the Matador Arch.

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GEOL2019TERRELL64068 GEOL

Pennsylvanian and Mississippian Stratigraphy, Little Hoss Ranch, Johnson County, Fort Worth Basin, Texas

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Aro Terrell Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Richard Denne Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 7

poster location

The primary objective of this study is to test my hypothesis that the stratigraphy within Little Hoss Ranch is very complex and diverse but correlative to the surrounding strata of similar depth and characteristics. The second objective is to identify characteristics of the stratigraphic facies to better aid in the production via recompletion or other determined methods within the Little Hoss area. Seismic data that will be analyzed within Little Hoss Ranch are made available by TEP Barnett. Seismic analysis will be done using Kingdom and will be assisted by the TEP geophysicist when possible. The goal is to use these data to better identify faults and other significant structural features within the area as well as the Barnett Shale stratigraphy for LHR. A map will be made using the seismic data and logs will be included in the map for reference and quality check purposes. The seismic, well log, and cutting data for the LHR that will be analyzed was originally acquired by Chesapeake as early as 2008 and is now owned by TEP, Barnett. 127 well logs will be analyzed using PETRA, within and immediately adjacent to the Little Hoss Ranch area, to better correlate and map the stratigraphy within the Little Hoss Ranch and will be tied to the LHR wells with surrounding wells in Johnson County and Tarrant County to create regional cross-sections. An additional cross-section will be created with the wells to the north in Tarrant County to display structural trends and stratigraphic facies correlation. The 127 LHR wells will be used to create a detailed structure map that can be compared to the seismic time structure map. The BHT will be used from the well logs as well as production data (oil to gas ratio) to determine if differential thermal maturity occurred within the area The overall goal of this project is to analyze the stratigraphy and structure of the Barnett Shale play within the Little Hoss Ranch confines and to identify any geologic effects or geologic solutions to marginal production for the area of study. Seismic data, well-logs, core and cuttings, mud-log descriptions, and background literature research will be used to conduct a thorough investigation into the stratigraphy affecting the LHR. The wells in the LHR will be used with wells in northern parts of the Fort Worth Basin to create a cross section spanning a larger area. This will help to better correlate the stratigraphy for the basin and help identify depositional and erosional changes in the Fort Worth Basin. Additionally, the OGIP data and calculations will be used to help define what the remaining hydrocarbon value is for the Barnett Shale within LHR.

(Poster is private)

GEOL2019TOTZ51136 GEOL

A GIS Analysis of Crustal Stress Directions and Orientation of Horizontal Drilling in the Permian Basin in West Texas

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Samuel Totz Geological Sciences
Advisor(s): Tamie Morgan Geological Sciences Helge Alsleben Geological Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 6

poster location

The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of information on the stress field of the present-day earth crust and is maintained since 2009 at the Helmholtz Center Potsdam GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences. This database uses data from earthquake focal mechanisms, well bore breakouts, drilling induced fractures, and geologic data to generate a map of the stresses in the Earth. Using GIS, the data was mapped and examined for the Permian Basin area of West Texas which is currently one of the largest and most active oil fields in the United States. This database in conjunction with data collected on the direction of horizontal well bores was examined to determine if or how stress directions in the Earth influenced the drilling bore direction. This data was also used to see if there is a correlation between stress direction and a company’s decision to place a well in a certain location or orientation.

(Poster is private)

INTR2019PRICE54426 INTR

Texas Christian University Green Chemistry Cleanup: Revamp, Reorganize, and Recycle

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Adrianna Price Biology Hannah Carey Chemistry & Biochemistry Lexi Goehring Chemistry & Biochemistry Taylor Gray Chemistry & Biochemistry Nicholas Henderson Chemistry & Biochemistry Filza Qureshi Psychology
Advisor(s): Heidi Conrad Chemistry & Biochemistry Julie Fry Chemistry & Biochemistry Kayla Green Chemistry & Biochemistry
Location: Session: 1; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 5

poster location

Professors and Texas Christian University Chemistry students collaborated with O.D. Wyatt High School faculty and students for the rewrite of laboratory experiments. This was done through the lens of green chemistry to best meet the needs of the school’s curriculum scope and sequence with a minimal budget. The primary focus was safety. Safer disposal of hazardous waste, the use of less hazardous chemicals, and a cleanup to provide a safe workspace. Following the redesign of the experiments with the implementation of green chemistry concepts, a thorough cleaning and reorganization of the high school’s storeroom took place. Excess chemicals were safely disposed of, an inventory system was adopted to track presence and location of the remaining chemicals, and all waste and recycling was properly discarded. At the end of this outreach program, O.D. Wyatt gained a revamped curriculum utilizing less hazardous materials, a green chemistry outlook, and a redesigned and safe storeroom. We TCU students gained practical experience redesigning laboratory protocols and adapting them to a green chemistry standard. Additionally, physically applying the techniques learned in the curriculum being taught is invaluable knowledge gained by many students involved. Furthermore, we have also gained the interpersonal communication skills required to simplify complicated concepts to an audience of high school students without scientific backgrounds. This outreach will have long-term positive effects on the high school. The students will be exposed to green chemistry principles and the faculty will see the ease with which green chemistry principles can be added and relished within their curriculum. This program will continue to impact O.D. Wyatt with long-term safety and cost efficiency tactics being employed.

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MATH2019RABBY57606 MATH

Invariants of Triple Conics in Projective Three Space

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Fazle Rabby Mathematics
Advisor(s): Scott Nollet Mathematics
Location: Session: 1; Basement; Table Number: 12

poster location

An algebraic curve is a one-dimensional set defined by polynomial equations, such as a parabola in the plane (given by y-x^2=0) or the z-axis in the space (given by x=y=0). Let Y be an algebraic curve. Then a multiplicity structure on Y is another curve Z, which as a set has the same points as Y but with a higher and fixed multiplicity at each point. For example, the y-axis in the plane is given by the equation x=0 and if we intersect it with horizontal lines, say with y-b=0, we get the points (0,b) on the y-axis. Now if we take the line given by x^2=0 and intersect it with the horizontal lines as above we get the points (0,b) with multiplicity 2. Hence we call the later curve a double structure on the previous one. Similarly the equation x^3=0 gives a triple structure on the y-axis in the plane and so on. Structures like these might sound naive but they are crucial to understand the behaviors of families of curves. For example, the family of parabolas ty-x^2=0 deforms into the double line x^2=0 as t approaches 0. Although the notion of multiplicity is pretty geometric, we can use tools from abstract algebra to make it rigorous. This makes the subject challenging and yet very interesting at the same time. Classifying the multiplicity structures on a curve is still a wide open field in algebraic geometry. It is now well understood how the double and triple structures on a line look. A natural question then arises how do the double and triple structures look on conics? It turns out that the answers are much more complicated than for lines. In this poster I am going to show some of my research in that direction.

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MATH2019WAGNER64069 MATH

The Crossed Product Structure of C*-Algebras Arising from Uniformly Recurrent Subgroups

Type: Graduate
Author(s): Douglas Wagner Mathematics
Advisor(s): José Carrión Mathematics
Location: Session: 1; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 2

poster location

A group is a mathematical construct that represents the symmetries of an object. These symmetries transform the object through what is called a group action. Graphs—Cayley graphs, in particular—provide a rich source of symmetries for forming groups. A graph and its group action can be modeled by a collection of infinite matrices known as a C*-algebra. In a paper in the Journal of Functional Analysis, Gábor Elek used dynamical systems called Uniformly Recurrent Subgroups (URS) to construct a new type of C*-algebra. We relate this C*-algebra to a well-known construction called the crossed-product. This reinterpretation more prominently displays the group action, which proves useful as we further study the C*-algebra’s structure.

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NTDT2019ADAMS56499 NTDT

A CULINARY MEDICINE COURSE IMPROVES NUTRITION AND DIETARY COMPETENCIES OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS STUDENTS

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Angela Adams Nutritional Sciences Haley Tullos Nutritional Sciences
Advisor(s): Lyn Dart Nutritional Sciences Rebecca Dority Nutritional Sciences Anne VanBeber Nutritional Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 1

poster location

Background: Nutrition plays a vital role in disease prevention and health promotion; however, few health professions curriculums provide adequate nutrition education. The Culinary Medicine program (CM) was developed at Tulane University Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine in 2012 to train health professions students about nutrition and healthy eating practices. Students also participate in a 10-year longitudinal study (Cooking for Health Optimization with Patients, CHOP) to assess learning outcomes.
Objective: Assess outcomes of a CM course for improving nutrition and dietary competencies of health professions students.
Design: Cohort of 77 medical and 13 physician assistant students (57/female; 33/male) from University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) and Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM).
Methods: The CM curriculum was first offered in Fort Worth, TX in 2014 and taught by faculty from UNTHSC, TCOM, Texas Christian University (TCU) and Moncrief Cancer Institute. During 2016-2018, students participating in the CM course were assessed using the 4-part CHOP survey including demographics, attitudes, dietary habits, and degree of proficiency in competencies related to nutrition/dietary knowledge and application. Study procedures were approved by TCU IRB, and informed consent was obtained. Data were analyzed to meet study objectives (SPSS, p<0.05).
Results: Results showed that students who participated in the CM course reported greater proficiency in their ability to inform patients about nutrition/dietary competencies: (1) health effects of the Mediterranean, Dash, and low fat diets; (2) weight loss strategies, portion control, food label facts and serving sizes; (3) dietary practices for type 2 diabetes, celiac disease, and food allergies; (4) role of dietary cholesterol/saturated fats in blood lipids; (5) recognizing warning signs/symptoms for eating disorders; and (6) role of fiber and omega-3 fatty acids in disease prevention and heart health (p<0.05).
Conclusion: Study results underline the value of dietetics educators providing innovative learning opportunities that integrate nutrition into training for health professions students.

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NTDT2019COWART45959 NTDT

Determining Level of Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet by Individuals Living in the United States

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Stephanie Cowart Nutritional Sciences Rachel Seguin Nutritional Sciences
Advisor(s): Anne VanBeber Nutritional Sciences Lyn Dart Nutritional Sciences
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 3

poster location

DETERMINING LEVEL OF ADHERANCE TO THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET BY INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES

S. Cowart,1 R. Seguin,1 A. VanBeber PhD, RD, LD, FAND1; L. Dart, PhD, RD, LD1;
1Texas Christian University

Learning Outcome: To determine how closely components of the Mediterranean Diet are followed by individuals living in the United States.

Learning Needs Codes:
Primary: 3020 Assessment of Target Groups
Secondary: 4040 Disease Prevention

Background: Research indicates those who follow a diet and lifestyle resembling the Mediterranean Diet have lower chronic disease risk.

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine how closely the Mediterranean Diet was followed by individuals living in the United States and to analyze correlations between dietary patterns and chronic disease risk.

Design: This un-blinded, randomized trial was approved by Texas Christian University IRB. Participants were recruited via social media, email/text messaging, and in-person communication. Following informed consent, participants completed an online questionnaire through Survey Monkey™. Analyses assessed consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy, legumes, animal protein, nuts, water, and red wine compared to Mediterranean Diet Score recommendations.

Methods: Data were analyzed using SPSS (p<0.05) and (p<0.01), and frequency distributions and correlations were analyzed for trends in adherence to Mediterranean Diet and USDA dietary recommendations.

Results: Participants included 258 females and males (86% and 14%, respectively). Sixty-nine percent identified as Caucasian, 21% Hispanic, 10% other ethnicity, and 13% reported chronic disease diagnosis. High school diploma was the highest education earned by 13% of participants; 28% obtained some college, and 59% received a bachelor’s degree or higher. Forty-six percent were married; 41% were single. A strong inverse relationship existed between age and physical activity, with participants ages 18-34 years reporting greater physical activity compared to participants >35 years old (r=-.131; p=0.05). With participants who performed >30-60 minutes physical activity/day, a positive relationship existed with greater consumption of vegetables and fruits (r=.200; p=0.05). Results also indicated only 36% of participants consumed the Mediterranean Diet Score recommendations for >2-3 cups vegetables/day, and only 22% consumed the recommended >2 cups fruit/day.

Conclusions: To lower chronic disease risk in the United States, nutrition education efforts should focus on importance of increasing fruit and vegetable consumption and greater adherence to Mediterranean Diet principles.

Funding Source: N/A
Word Count: 296
Key Contact: Anne VanBeber RD, LD, PhD, FAND, a.vanbeber@tcu.edu

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NTDT2019DECKARD16889 NTDT

The Effect of Knowledge, Behaviors and Attitudes towards Dietary Fatty Acids on BLood Lipid Levels

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Amber Deckard Nutritional Sciences Cassidy Shabay Nutritional Sciences
Advisor(s): Jada Stevenson Nutritional Sciences
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 5

poster location

Learning Outcome: Provide education about the knowledge, behaviors and attitudes individuals have towards dietary fatty acids.

Background: Research has shown a strong relationship between dietary fatty acids (FAs) and their impact on blood cholesterol. Few studies have examined knowledge, behaviors and attitudes (KBA) towards dietary FAs impact on blood lipid levels.
Objective: To determine: 1) KBA of FAs using the modified General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (GNKQ); and 2) correlations between anthropometric data, GNKQ responses and blood lipid levels.
Design: This study utilized a cross-sectional research design.
Methods: Upon IRB approval, 104 women ages 18-40yr consented and completed the modified GNKQ via Qualtrics®. The GNKQ consisted of 42 questions and took approximately 15min to complete. Additionally, a subset of nine women also were instructed to fast for 12-15hrs prior to testing at the Obesity Prevention Laboratory at TCU. Height (cm), weight (kg), BMI (kg/m2), waist-to-hip ratio were recorded. Next, a fasting blood sample (5mL) was obtained. The blood samples were sent to AnyLabTestNow® (Fort Worth, Texas) for a lipid panel. Results were analyzed via IBM SPSS® (Statistics Version 25.0. Armonk, NY). Significance was set at p<0.05.
Results: More than 80% of participants were aware of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated FAs, but only 33.3% were able to identify their proper food sources. Of the survey responses, approximately 1.9% demonstrated poor knowledge (answered 0-11 questions correctly), 54.3% moderate knowledge (12-23 questions correctly), and 43.8% strong knowledge (24-34 questions correctly). 100% of lipid panel participants had normal total cholesterol and HDL levels. Risk ratio (LDL/HDL) and weight showed a strong positive correlation (p=0.004, r=0.846**).
Conclusion: Despite self-reported awareness, participants lack knowledge of dietary FAs. The subset results showed strong correlation between risk ratio and weight representing the relationship between weight and lipid levels. Overall, more research should ensue with a larger sample.

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