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ENGR2018DECK55779 ENGR

HyPIR Electrolysis for Potasium Hydroxide Solutions at Different Molarity Concentrations

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Trystan Deck Engineering Aliesha Rau Engineering
Advisor(s): John Fanchi Engineering
Location: Session: 1; Basement; Table Number: 3

poster location

We are presenting a method referred to as Hydrogen Production by HyPIR Electrolysis. The method increases the rate of hydrogen production from a potassium hydroxide and water solution, at different molarities, when an infrared laser is irradiated with an optimum wavelength of light through a cell containing the solution. The irradiating light facilitates the dissociation of water by stretching the hydrogen oxygen bond and increasing the rate of hydrogen production.

ENGR2018DEVOOGHT32056 ENGR

FDM 3D Printing Mechanical Properties

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Luke Devooght Engineering Melina Aguera Engineering
Advisor(s): Becky Bittle Engineering
Location: Session: 1; Basement; Table Number: 13

poster location

In this experiment, the mechanical properties of 3D printed specimens of different printing parameters were tested under tension. The printing parameters of these specimens were: surface resolution, infill density, and print orientation. Parts were printed in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic with a Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) printer called the Stratasys UPrint SE Plus. Specimens were first printed similar to Stratasys published material properties standards and then tested to form a control on these known properties. Factorial sets of specimens using all various parameters were then printed and tested to create a reference table for future engineering projects.

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ENGR2018ELLIOTT14728 ENGR

Rare Earth Elements

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Lindsey Elliott Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering Efstathios Michaelides Engineering Ken Morgan Geology
Location: Session: 1; Basement; Table Number: 1

poster location

From an engineering perspective, Rare Earth elements have the potential to transform technology in previously unprecedented ways. Their magnetic, luminescent, and electromechanical capabilities are allowing electronic devices to become more compact, reduce emissions, operate more efficiently, and cost less to produce and purchase. Such developments are proving beneficial to the economies of many developed nations because of their use in popular everyday consumer technologies as well as industries such as healthcare and education.

Along with this positive impact comes a political overlay that threatens the longevity of Rare Earth use. Presently, Rare Earths are expensive and dangerous to extract. This is largely due to the fact that they are not found together in large concentrations, so it is only economically feasible to extract them with another material, such as coal. The process of extraction is also hazardous and cumbersome; separating Rare Earths from other materials involves processes with high levels of emissions that may be dangerous to human beings if overexposure occurs. On the other hand, nations with more flexible safety and health regulations are investing in the development of Rare Earths and setting themselves apart as production leaders. Nations with more stringent health and safety regulations are becoming dependent on these nations to provide the Rare Earths for their applications. As a result, leaders in engineering industry can only benefit from Rare Earths if they develop systems that use Rare Earths more effectively than other materials commercially available and develop a reliable business relationship with a Rare Earth supplier. This condition is not likely to be encountered frequently in today's intricate social webs and economic systems.

The possibility of extracting Rare Earths through more efficient, safer processes is becoming recognized as a relevant topic of research. Additionally, investigation into alternatives to Rare Earths in some of the more common applications may allow for safer and less politically charged production methods for many 21st century advancements.

Through literary investigation, this research project seeks to highlight the main characteristics that makes Rare Earths desirable from an engineering perspective, proposed alternatives to Rare Earths based on engineering demands, and the direction of the Rare Earth industry as a result.

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ENGR2018KRAUSE24985 ENGR

Autonomous Vehicle With Room Mapping And Obstacle Avoidance

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Ben Krause Engineering Chris Prasai Engineering Bao Thach Engineering
Advisor(s): Morgan Kiani Engineering
Location: Session: 2; 3rd Floor; Table Number: 6

poster location

The goal of this project is to design and construct a small modular autonomous car with room mapping and obstacle avoidance capabilities. The vehicle would be useful in cases where it is dangerous for a human to complete a task, or where it is more efficient to have an autonomous vehicle to scout ahead. A key design goal for this project was also to create an inexpensive platform for research into the realm of autonomous vehicles. The car uses lidar technology to create real time 2D room map and detect obstacles. It is programmed to explore rooms and move without human input. We designed the car with a powerful on board computer, enabling it to run complicated programs and operate without the need of an outside computer.

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ENGR2018SHORT10771 ENGR

Back to Analog - Wind Tunnel Force Balancer

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Justin Short Engineering Talha Mushtaq Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 8

poster location

Advancements in 21st century aviation has remarkably transformed transportation and defense. It has greatly and positively affected our lives for almost a century. Analog systems had great influence on aircraft avionics before the invention of the digital systems. Digital systems are a key component of aircraft testing and design, especially in analyzing aerodynamic drag. Since the creation of digital systems, our world around us has changed drastically and has led us to develop measuring devices that conveniently transform analog data into digital data. Digital data is a discrete representation of information that is produced through step-approximations of a continuous function, which causes the captured data to lose its resolution. In an attempt to minimize this error, digital devices with higher accuracy and sensitivities have been developed, yet like most things, they possess operational boundaries. The piezoelectric sensor - current measuring device - produces accurate data readings when wind speeds and drag forces on the test model are high. However, as the drag forces drop off under lower wind speeds, the data tends to drift away from the reference data models.
The solution to this digital error, while increasing data resolution, is to develop an analog balancing system. A mechanical balancer can be installed to measure drag force on small spheres of different sizes and material properties. Also, another benefit of the new design will come in the form of educational learning. The simplicity of the design will encourage students to incorporate a more hands on approach to aerodynamics, which is a pathway to turn the intangible into something they can touch.

ENGR2018TASMIM18442 ENGR

Development of a Device for controlling a Light Switch with a Remote Controller

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Seelay Tasmim Engineering Annie Le Engineering
Advisor(s): Sue Gong Engineering
Location: Session: 2; Basement; Table Number: 13

poster location

The goal of this project is to develop a low cost and user-friendly device for remote actuation of light switches. We envision a product that is simple to install, easy to control via a remote, and able to function with a variety of light switch geometries. This device can minimize the inconvenience as well as the risk of injuries from turning the light on and off in the dark, especially for elderly people. For this target end user, the device must be simple and require no technical knowledge. Because of this, we have designed a mechanical actuator that will be mounted to the outside of a light switch without the need for tools and controlled by a simple button remote to be kept at the bedside.

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ENGR2018TOLBERT23197 ENGR

Tracking High Velocity Metal Objects

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Jacob Tolbert Engineering Lindsey Elliott Engineering Maya Hall Engineering John Hofmeister Engineering Darian Nezami Engineering Matt Spallas Engineering Cole Vallow Engineering
Advisor(s): Mike Harville Engineering Stephen Weis Engineering
Location: Session: 2; 1st Floor; Table Number: 2

poster location

Tracking and recording data from high velocity objects is a difficult task, especially when the object is hidden from view during portions of its flight path. When tasked with this problem, the process of solving it began with copious amounts of research into existing and developing technologies. From thermal imaging to radar detection, many options were explored.
Through a rigorous process of elimination to determine the most efficient and cost effective option, induction coils were chosen as the speed sensing device needed to track the desired objects. Normally when current is induced in one of these coils, there is an unchanging frequency of that current. However, when a conductive material passes through the center of a coil, the original frequency changes. This change can be monitored, giving valuable information about an object's location when evaluated over a specific time period.
After hours of bench top testing, several conclusions were made about the production and effectiveness of the induction coils. Chiefly, it was found that the smaller the induction coil diameter the more effective, the object passing through the coil has a larger effect if it does not pass through the exact center, and the "sweet spot" for the number of coil turns falls between 15-25 turns.

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ENGR2018VICTORIAN55314 ENGR

ACME senior design

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Brandon Victorian Engineering Matt Leonard Engineering Lauren Trost Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering
Location: Session: 1; 2nd Floor; Table Number: 3

poster location

Senior design SRS submission:

For our presentation we hope to speak on three of our major groups of our senior design team:
Our first piece involves using programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that are used as the electrical interface between the programming and the mechanical system. Through its own ladder logic program, the code enables the PLC user to dictate when certain relays should be opened or closed for the purpose of turning on and off the vacuum supply and power sources. The PLC then collects data from the pressure transducers so that a signal indicating the next step is sent back to the design. After reading the pressure associated with a certain head, the user can then close a solenoid valve by sending a signal to it via the PLC which will stop the flow of air. With the PLC, the user is in control of where the flow is going to and is consequently, able to modify it through the code. Although the PLC is not a power supply, it does have the ability of processing information by receiving and sending out specified actions, set by the user, to different electronic and mechanical components.
The second piece is based of a tool from a company called pave more. The “pave more” design is a design that picks up bricks from the hack to a separate location to pack them. The design uses separate heads that pick-up bricks using foam that creates a seal on the brick. The heads are connected to a vacuum that allows us to pick up the bricks efficiently. The heads are each on their own spring system that allows them to be picked up at different heights. They are also each on a separate solenoid valve that will sense a missing brick and close the valve to still allow the system to pick up the bricks. The vacuum system is connected to a filter to protect it from the dust and dirt that are on the bricks.

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ENGR2017CULVER43732 ENGR

Self-Erecting Inverted Pendulum

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Steve Culver Engineering
Advisor(s): Walt Williamson Engineering

In this experiment, we examine the non-linear dynamics of a mechanical system consisting of an inverted pendulum with one free-turning rotational degree-of-freedom attached to a computer-controlled cart with one linear degree-of-freedom. Using a Quanser Linear Servo Base Unit with Inverted Pendulum and paired software package, we used first principles to develop the non-linear control system needed to move the pendulum from stable equilibrium to unstable equilibrium and maintain unstable equilibrium. This combines the self-erecting inverted pendulum experiment and the classic pendulum experiment. Through the paired software package, we were able to derive the dynamic equations to develop the transfer function and proportional-velocity feedback system that describe the linear motion of the cart, successfully creating the non-linear control system for both phases of the experiment.

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ENGR2017CULVER58673 ENGR

Use of an Xbox Kinect™ as a 3D Scanner for the Manufacturing of Custom Orthotic Insoles

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Steve Culver Engineering
Advisor(s): Steve Weis Engineering

This report examines the function, accuracy, and ease of use of an XBOX Kinect™ as a 3D surface scanner. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate the utility of a Kinect™ for XBOX 360 (Microsoft®) paired with Skanect (Occipital) and MeshLab software packages as a low cost solution to surface scanning and processing. My conclusion is that the Kinect™ is able to accurately model the recorded point cloud as a continuous 3D surface that matches the contour and scale of the test subject surface. Both Skanect and MeshLab effectively interpolated the smoothing of the 3D surfaces and provided higher resolution imaging than an unaltered image. The resultant resolution of the contoured surface is higher than the resolution of the 3D printers used in this experiment, demonstrating an effective digital duplication of a physical surface.

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ENGR2017GETZ62984 ENGR

Design and Development of an Electronic Stability System for a Digital Small Hole Gauge

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Lauren Getz Engineering Robin Livesay Engineering Karla Lopez Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering

For this project, a digital grip gauge was designed for Lockheed Martin to measure the grip length of the aircraft skin of the F-35. The objective of the electrical group is to ensure that the gauge will be capable of recognizing when the measurement has stabilized. When stabilized, a light will turn on, which allows the operator to know the measurement is ready for reading. We developed three prototypes that each complete this objective. The first prototype uses two force sensitive resistors (FSR) powered by Arduino. The Arduino code is programmed to turn on a light when the forces on the sensors are equal for a certain range within different zones. The second prototype consists of a comparator circuit with two FSRs connected to a NAND gate. When both FSRs measure the same force, within a range, a light will turn on. The third prototype utilizes two small push buttons that complete a circuit. When both buttons are pressed, the circuit is completed and a light will turn on, indicating to the operator that the part is flush with the aircraft skin and the measurement is stabilized. While each of these prototypes satisfies the objective, the third prototype was ultimately selected due to size constraints of the gauge design.

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ENGR2017HALL10343 ENGR

Image Reconstruction Using Compressive Line Sensing

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Maya Hall Engineering
Advisor(s): Sue Gong Engineering

Compressive line sensing is a process of acquiring data and reconstructing images. The objective of this study is to explore the impact of the two parameters that are used in the image reconstruction algorithm on the quality of the reconstructed image. These two parameters are the compression ratio and the line group. The compression ratio is the ratio of the number of measurements taken at each line vs. the resolution of each line. The line group is the number of lines that are grouped together and solved jointly when reconstructing the image. A higher compression ratio results in degraded image quality because less measurement data is used to reconstruct the image. The larger the line group, the better the quality of the image at a cost of longer computation time. The key is to find a balance between the compression ratio and line group choices so that the image is reconstructed with as little data as possible while still maintaining a high image quality. We will present images reconstructed with different compression ratio and line group based on the data obtained in air and in water.

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ENGR2017SCHMITZBERGER13895 ENGR

Design and Development of a Digital Grip Gauge using a Split Ball Probe

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Evan Schmitzberger Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering

The objective of our work is to design and build a depth gauge that efficiently and accurately measures the depth of a narrow hole, and give feedback via an electronic screen on the device. This design is being made for Lockheed Martin and will allow their employees to measure a large amount of rivet holes both quicker and more accurately than their current solution. Speeding up the measuring process while retaining accuracy will cut down on production time significantly. Our design was founded on the idea of a small hole gage, we modified the gage to be set up as a probe and anchor onto the back side of the hole. The probe has been coined as a “split-ball” due to its inner shaft splitting the outer shaft that contains a ball type end effecter. Our prototype has been through many iterations utilizing the on campus Fab Lab to 3D print most of our parts. Our mechanical team has been in close work with our electrical team to ensure that the mechanics and electronics function together seamlessly.

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ENGR2017SMITH41122 ENGR

Design and Development of a Digital Small Hole Gauge using a Wire Probe

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Logan Smith Engineering
Advisor(s): Robert Bittle Engineering

The objective of our work is to design and build a depth gauge that efficiently and accurately measures the depth of a narrow hole, and give feedback via an electronic screen on the device. This design is being made for Lockheed and Martin and will allow their employees to measure a large amount of rivet holes both quicker and more accurately than their current solution. Speeding up the measuring process while retaining accuracy will cut down on production time significantly. Our design is small enough to be held in one hand and contains a wire probe that is plunged into the hole and latches onto the other side. The probe is “Tweezer-like” in design, with two wires that collapse and expand with the use of a button. Many parts of our design are made using a 3D printer for convenience and repeatability. Our design is able to communicate with electronics stored within the gauge that measures the depth and displays to an LCD screen.

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ENGR2017TEAGUE7756 ENGR

Design of an Automated Adhesive Dispensing System

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Connor Teague Engineering
Advisor(s): Sue Gong Engineering

Klein Tools is a major hand tools manufacturer in US focused on electrical and utility applications for professionals. One of Klein Tools products is called a fish rod that is used by professional electricians to pull wiring through walls, conduit, and plenums to route wire from one place to another. The current fish rod assembly process at Klein Tools involves manual dispensing of glue into the metal connectors before affixing them to fiberglass rods. The objective of this Klein Tools-sponsored project is to improve the throughput of assembly system and increase the accuracy and the consistency of the amount of glue dispensed to reduce product failures and adhesive waste.

The overall system in development consists of an automated metal connector orientation system, conveyor belt assembly, a glue dispensing system and a control system. Through the application of vibratory hopper feeders, pneumatic rotary tables and grippers, sensing cameras, break line sensors, and a conveyor belt, the system will orient the metal connectors glue side up, and present the connectors with adhesive to the operator for final assembly of the fish rods.

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ENGR2017THACH58782 ENGR

Trajectory tracking in unmanned electric vehicles

Type: Undergraduate
Author(s): Bao Thach Engineering Irene Kwihangana Engineering
Advisor(s): Morgan Kiani Engineering

In this research project, the aim was to create a small, self-operated robot car to transport items. In addition, the robot-car can generate a distance when traveling through unknown places, and self-locate them in the next travels. The student authors hope that this robot car can be used to physically communicate and send medical supplies between severe patients and doctors in hospitals.

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